Primrose Hill Doors

Back in UK for a short break to see family and friends, I wandered around Primrose Hill and Regent’s Park, in north London. It was a typical spring day, warm in the sunshine, cool in the shade and perishingly cold when the wind blew.

‘I have conversed with the spiritual Sun. I saw him on Primrose Hill’ – William Blake

One of the pioneers of photography, Roger Fenton (1819-1869), lived in this house according to the blue circular plaque.

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The gardens in Regent’s Park were lovely, so I took lots of photos of tulips, daffodils and cherry blossom. But this blog is about doors, so here is the door to a quaint little cafeteria in the park.

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Cumberland terrace overlooks Regent’s Park. There is a garden between the road and the houses, so I couldn’t get very close to show the doors. Instead, you get a bigger view.

The Danish Church looks rather like a mini-Kings College Chapel in Cambridge. The gnarly tree in the courtyard is amazing.

Finally, a bit of bathos – from the sublime to the ridiculous. Traditional South London food – eel and mash, or in a pie – here in Peckham, snapped from the top floor of a double decker bus driving past, hence the blurred photo. For more about this culinary delicacy, click here.

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22 Replies to “Primrose Hill Doors”

    1. Wikipedia says: Pie and mash is a traditional London working-class food, originating in London. Pie, mash and eel shops have been in London since the 19th century, and are still common in East and South East London and in many parts of Kent and Essex. The shops may serve stewed and/or jellied eels.

      1. I don’t think so. Shark, yes, but never eel. Is this what this sweet little cafe serves? And here I am thinking of pastries and coffee…

      2. WIKIPEDIA: Pie and mash is a traditional London working-class food, originating in London. Pie, mash and eel shops have been in London since the 19th century, and are still common in East and South East London and in many parts of Kent and Essex. The shops may serve stewed and/or jellied eels.

  1. Someone from St Johns lived on Primrose Hill, I vaguely remember. Ate many a pie while teaching in the East End – not to mention bagels and curries. At college in Isleworth we’d catch eels swimming up the creek behind our digs, not far from Eel Pie Island.
    Love your blog posts and photos, Ian. Happy English Spring break!

    1. I remember going to a psychiatric conference at a hotel on the River Thames called Monkey Island (= monk eel island). One of the participants collapsed and all the psychiatrists looked to me for help ‘because you’re a proper doctor’

  2. Love that tiny white brick house! And I happen to love smoked eel! Now, you’re account of the psychiatric conference shows why in my circles we call the proper doctors M. Deities.

    1. M Deity I certainly am not! But it was amusing that all the fancy professors are so far removed from practical patient care that they were relieved there was a lowly GP around

      1. Well …I’ll give you the benefit of the doubt, but only because my youngest brother is a GP:) At my last year of training the psychiatrists around told me, they were the lowest on the totempole – so I guess it may differ from place to place.

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